Mosque and Madrassa of Um Sultan Shaaban

Mosque and Madrassa of Um Sultan Shaaban

The Mosque and Madrassa of Um Sultan Shaaban is a Mamluk-era complex situated in the Al-Darb al-Ahmar area of Islamic Cairo in Egypt.It absolutely was founded or integrated 1368-69 CE (770 AH) on the order of Sultan al-Ashraf Sha’ban in honour of his mother, Khawand Baraka (also called Umm al-Sultan Sha’ban). It is found outside Bab Zuweila along al-Tabbana street, and is adjoined to the north by the Bayt al-Razzaz palace.The complex is composed of a college (madrasa), mausoleum, water trough (hawd), and a principal school (maktab).


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Mosque and Madrassa of UmSultan Shaaban


Mosque and Madrassa of UmSultan Shaaban


Mosque and Madrassa of UmSultan Shaaban


Mosque and Madrassa of UmSultan Shaaban


Mosque and Madrassa of UmSultan Shaaban


Mosque and Madrassa of UmSultan Shaaban


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Al-Ashraf Sha’ban was a son of al-Nasir Muhammad and ruled from 1363 to 1377, being only 10 years of age when he stumbled on the throne. His mother, Khawand Baraka, was one of the very notable powerful feamales in Egypt as of this time. She was concubine then wife to Husayn (Sha’ban’s father), a boy of Sultan al-Nasir Muhammad who never rose to the throne. When Husayn died in 1362, she married the amir Uljay al-Yusufi (who built their own madrasa in the nearby Suq al-Silah street). She grew more influential and well-known when Sha’ban stumbled on the throne as a child.

Sha’ban commissioned this madrasa and mausoleum in 1368-69 (770 AH) reportedly to honour his mother who had been on pilgrimage (hajj) to Mecca at the time. However, given his early age (15) during the time, there’s a reasonable chance that your choice to construct the madrasa was relating together with his mother’s own wishes, especially as you can find few other samples of such impressive monuments being built for the feminine relatives of Mamluk sultans. Your website of the madrasa was reportedly once a cemetery for the individuals of Cairo.[4] Khawand returned to Cairo another year (in 1369-70) and endowed the madrasa and its mosque. She died in 1373 and was buried in the more expensive of both mausoleums mounted on her madrasa.

In 1375 Sha’ban founded and embarked on the construction of their own ambitious mosque, madrasa, and mausoleum complex in 1375, on the place of what’s now the Maristan of al-Mu’ayyad, at the northwestern foot of the Citadel.It absolutely was lavishly decorated and, like his mother’s madrasa, it’d two domes (probably inspired by the double-domed mausoleums to the south of the Citadel, such as for example the Sultaniyya Mausoleum). However, Sha’ban was assassinated in 1377, before his mausoleum complex was finished and ready for use. He wound up instead being buried in small mausoleum of his mother’s madrasa. The complex he’d begun to construct was eventually dismantled by Sultan Faraj ibn Barquq in 1411 to be able to reuse its materials for numerous other buildings like the so-called Zawiya of Faraj ibn Barquq, situated in front of Bab Zuweila, and the madrasa-mosque of his emir Jamal al-Din Ustadar.

Once completed, the madrasa taught Islamic law in the Hanafi and Shafi’i madhhabs. Some excellent illuminated manuscripts of the Qur’an date from Sha’ban’s reign and it’s believed that madrasa might have contained a workshop for producing them. The Museum of Islamic Art in Cairo even offers other well-crafted artifacts which come out of this madrasa.

In the late 15th century, Sultan Qaytbay built a palace or mansion adjacent to the madrasa. In the 19th century, the palace was merged with another adjacent mansion integrated 1776 by Ahmad al-Razzaz. The building has become called Bayt al-Razzaz, and today its façade is contiguous with the façade of the madrasa of Sha’ban. Starting in 2000, the building was restored by the Aga Khan Trust for Culture.


City: cairo
Region: El-Darb El-Ahmar, El Khalifa
Place: Mosque and Madrassa of UmSultan Shaaban
Date: 16/9/2022
Location: see on map


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