Consists of thirteen rows of marble seats

Consists of thirteen rows of marble seats

The Roman Amphitheatre In Alexandria. This practice was as a result of a moratorium on everlasting theatre buildings that lasted until 55 BC when the Theatre of Pompey was constructed with the addition of a temple to avoid the regulation. Some Roman theatres present indicators of by no means having been accomplished within the first place. The Roman Amphitheater consists of thirteen rows of marble seats numbered utilizing the Greek figures to find a way to regulate and facilitate the seating procedures of the audience.


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Ancient Roman Theatre-Alexandria


Ancient Roman Theatre-Alexandria


Consists of thirteen rows of marble seats


Consists of thirteen rows of marble seats


Ancient Roman Theatre-Alexandria


Ancient Roman Theatre-Alexandria


Ancient Roman Theatre-Alexandria


Ancient Roman Theatre-Alexandria


Ancient Roman Theatre-Alexandria


Ancient Roman Theatre-Alexandria


Ancient Roman Theatre-Alexandria


Ancient Roman Theatre-Alexandria


Ancient Roman Theatre-Alexandria


Ancient Roman Theatre-Alexandria


Ancient Roman Theatre-Alexandria


Ancient Roman Theatre-Alexandria


Ancient Roman Theatre-Alexandria


Ancient Roman Theatre-Alexandria


Ancient Roman Theatre-Alexandria


Ancient Roman Theatre-Alexandria


Ancient Roman Theatre-Alexandria


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The Roman Amphitheatre is within the space near the Centre generally recognized as Kom El Dekka, which translated from Arabic means ‘ The hill of rubble’ or ‘The hill of benches’.
Ancient Roman theatres had an unusual patron: the god Bacchus. He is synonymous with the Greek Dionysus and is associated with the festival of Bacchanalia, which was famous for its lewd behaviour. Roman mime was often lewd, as were some of the plays. But Romans enjoyed it. And the ancient theatres even had a god dedicated to the performance of the play. If you have never been to a Roman play, it is time to take a look!


City: Alexandria
Region: Kom El Dikka
Place: Ancient Roman Theatre
Date: 23/4/2022
Location: see on map


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